Archive for October, 2005

Search history in bash

Thursday, October 13th, 2005

This is another quick tip: to search typed history at a bash prompt, hit control-r and start typing a command you used previously. It doesn’t have to start with what is typed, as it returns matches which contain the searched text.

Hit control-r again (while searching), and it will jump back further in history and search with the same text.

Hitting enter when bash finds something will run the command while hitting the arrow keys will allow you to move around and edit the command. The escape key will also exit the search and place the historical command on your command line. To cancel the search entirely, use control-c and you’ll be returned to a clean prompt (although the matching string will be presented above where you’re typing).

Super-useful inputrc

Thursday, October 13th, 2005

You either want to place the following in ~/.inputrc or /etc/inputrc… I’ve found that while ~/.inputrc works sometimes, it doesn’t on all systems.


"\e[1~": beginning-of-line
"\e[4~": end-of-line
"\e[5~": beginning-of-history
"\e[6~": end-of-history
"\e[3~": delete-char
"\e[2~": quoted-insert
"\e[5C": forward-word
"\e[5D": backward-word
"\e\e[C": forward-word
"\e\e[D": backward-word
set completion-ignore-case On

All lines except the last enable nice readline & bash cursor movement (control + arrow keys and what not) while the last line turns on case insensitivity for tab-completion, enabling you to have folders and files of mixed case characters while not having to type the capital letters. (You can have a directory called “Documents” and tab-complete by tying “doc<tab>

I’ve been enjoying the above for a while now, and I think it really should be the default settings for distributions.

Note: This works for Linux, Mac OS X, and *BSD. It might work for people using Bash on Windows, but you’re on your own there. (:

Bits of Tango clarification

Wednesday, October 12th, 2005

Slashdot got it nearly right, but a bit wrong: the Tango Project is about unifying the Open Source desktop, but it isn’t by Steven Garrity and Jakub Steiner alone. Steven and Jakub presented it at the GNOME Summit in Boston over the weekend, but Rodney Dawes, Tuomas Kuosmanen, Anna Dirks (site currently down), and myself all had a lot to do with making it a reality. A few others helped out along the way too, such as Trae McCombs.

In addition, Tuomas recently posted on his blog a bit more about Tango: Remember, Tango is not “yet another theme”, what I am even more interested in is to really look outside our “Gnome/KDE/Whatever” sandbox and try to fix the overall user experience on “Linux Desktop” – we need to co-operate really. Unified look and feel is one step in that direction, and a logical one for me as an artist.

Also of note is Steven Garrity’s post and Jakub Steiner’s post.

Tango Project!

Monday, October 10th, 2005

In addition to BetterDesktop, the Tango Project has finally been announced!

The Tango Desktop Project exists to create a consistent user experience for free and Open Source software with graphical user interfaces.”


A few Tango-style icons

Jakub has a great post which explains Tango more in-depth.

BetterDesktop.org

Monday, October 10th, 2005

Today, Novell is releasing something I (and the rest of the team I’m on) have been working on for a while: BetterDesktop.org, a website which focuses on usability studies and analysis for the Open Source desktop.

From the Summit: Banshee

Sunday, October 9th, 2005

Aaron’s Banshee presentation was totally awesome.

At first, the presentation computer (an MIT thing), caused the screen to roll up, the lights to turn fully bright — and then became a bit stubborn in doing the right thing. A few minutes later, after Aaron and Miguel (who stepped in to help), finally got the wall machine to work (after a reboot), the environmental settings started working right and the presentation went underway.

Aaron’s slides were well done and his topic (Banshee) was fascinating. It totally rocks.

After the slides, Aaron demonstrated various things Banshee can do currently and talked about where it is goind a bit more.

I think everyone in the room is really looking forward to the upcoming features in the music player. It already is quite nice, but is going to get pretty awesome soon.

By-the-way: It’s almost time for the community project website talk/BOF thing I’m going to be ringleading at 3:45 pm today.

About the laptops…

Saturday, October 8th, 2005

After Tuomas (tigert) arrived from his long plane flight, he opened up his laptop in a cube at work, resuming it from its suspended sleep. I was also in the same cube.

He then proceeded to show me something, but as soon as he pointed to it (with his finger toward the screen), the display went black. After trying all sorts of keypresses to wake the blank laptop, he decided to try to power cycle it. Weird things were happening on boot, and it would decide to either go blank or reboot at seemingly random places on start up. It even began having problems in the BIOS screen.

All of the laptop problems were eerily familiar — it was what my IBM ThinkPad was doing when I first got it. The difference was mine was on the first day and his was just this past week. Much like my laptop, his laptop’s cure is to get a motherboard replacement, so it was sent off to the service department.

Meanwhile… I also have a Mac laptop, so I have been using it while Tuomas has been using my ThinkPad (with his hard drive swapped out for mine). I don’t think he’ll get his laptop back before the conference, in around an hour…

Anyway, I just wanted to state the reason why I will have a Mac at the GNOME Summit instead of my ThinkPad.