Posts Tagged ‘Work’

Hack Week video

Tuesday, June 26th, 2007

Teams from around the world have been posting video on the Idea Pool website.

Here’s a video filmed and edited by Nat Friedman, and I’m featured at 1:46 into the video (at the end).

Yes, I was very, very tired making sure that the site was ready to launch and also traveling back to Europe. Shortly after arriving in Nuremberg, we were on Digg for several hours, so instead of taking a nap, I drank a lot of Red Bull and Afri-Cola so I could watch the website withstand “the Digg effect” (which used to be called “the Slashdot effect”, but we haven’t been on Slashdot yet. *hint*) and also take a lot of pictures.

Nat did a great job filming and editing the “from-the-trenches” Hack Week video; it’s quite funny.

Photos from Hack Week, day 1

Monday, June 25th, 2007

Check out my Hack Week photo set.


Nat with a watermelon and a highly caffeinated cola
during the first day of Hack Week

They’re in the the Hack Week group pool too.

I’ve also been posting a ton of photos to my flickr stream too, so check out the rest as well.

Hack Week and Ideas!

Monday, June 25th, 2007

Hey everyone! Check out the brand new idea.opensuse.org website I’ve been working on (with the help of Jakub, Larry, and Nat)! We are officially launching it today, kicking off the first day of Hack Week.

Hack Week!

To see photos from around the globe of people participating in Hack Week, check out the Hack Week flickr group.

Also, make sure to Digg the site too. (:

Adventures in git

Sunday, May 27th, 2007

I’m sure this isn’t news to a lot of you, but git is seriously cool.

I just discovered it this past week (after hearing a little about it once in a while since it started in 2005). I was mostly happy with Subversion (SVN) and CVS (before that)… but git is just way cooler due to its distributed nature, among other nifty things. It’s extremely fast, has easy tagging and branching, features amazing merging and patch management, and the repositories it makes take up very little disk space too. Also, due to being distributed (and having excellent management features), it makes working on a custom branch — even when offline — not only possible, but a total breeze compared to most other SCM / version control software.

People have also made git work pretty well with other software of its kind, most notably CVS and SVN so that one can work in git locally and publish changes to more traditional repositories.

Starting the adventure

My own foray in using git initially started just the other week when Nat was telling me all about it. I decided to take the plunge into git this past Friday.

To familiarize myself with this new version control software, I imported a project I am currently working on into a git repository (building up versions from pieces of snapshots I made at different stages), and worked on learning the basics through some pretty nice tutorials.

Benefits, already!

Using git seriously paid off. Late Friday evening, I upgraded some upstream software I had been using and it broke my project… I knew it must’ve been a simple one line change, but I didn’t know where exactly. This was, of course, right before I left the office for the three-day-weekend.

On Saturday, I wanted to get things working again — including all the new upstream changes (you know, bug fixes and what-not), but I did not have a ‘Net connection. Thankfully, it turns out git came to the rescue, due to its distributed nature.

Essentially, using git meant that I had my own little (very) compact repository with all of my changes, so I could check out old versions of files, examine changes, look at differences between my own tagged “releases”, and commit any change I wanted — all locally, without a centralized server or any sort of network connection.

Voila! I found the problem… it was, indeed, a simple one liner that made assumptions that weren’t true on my system. I fixed it, committed the change, and had everything working once again… all on my laptop, without access to the outside world.

My deciding to play around with this new version control system turned out to be quite fortuitous and timely. I really don’t know how I would’ve tracked down and fixed the simple, hiding show-stopping bug (especially without a network connection) so quickly and easily otherwise.

git more info…

If git sounds interesting to you, I’d suggest you check out the following:

git-ting to the point

It does take a short while to wrap one’s head around git (and make it second nature), especially if you’ve used CVS or SVN for so long, but the benefits make it totally worth investigating and trying out.

Genießen des Bieres in Deutschland

Sunday, May 14th, 2006

I’ve been in Germany for the past week, plus a few days. Early tomorrow (Monday), I’m flying back to the US.

Even though the trip has been primarily for work, I did manage to sqeeze in a few days of excellent photo shooting action. Expect to see some really cool shots getting posted very soon.

Currently, though, I’m enjoying my Würzburgian hefeweizen and cheesy cheese sticks in a German bar that’s playing 80s rock and has an very expensive wi-fi hotspot (T-Mobile).

Making Firefox fit in with the Linux desktop

Friday, December 2nd, 2005

As Firefox 1.5 is now here, I would like to say that I’m still very much interested in making Firefox fit in with the Linux desktop as I did with the Industrial theme for 1.0.x (which does not work with 1.5). However, a few things should be noted.

  1. First of all, I unfortunately do not have the time to currently work on Firefox beautification. I may have a little bit of time in a few weeks, but I also might not, depending on how things go. (Right now I’m working on some really cool stuff at work that you’ll see sometime in the future.)
  2. I’ve heard through some grapevine somewhere that there’s a patch for firefox to enable gtk-stock icon support for the default theme (and I believe it was done by someone at Red Hat, iirc). If this is true, then that’s half the battle to fitting in.*
  3. I really believe native looking changes should go upstream. This includes all of the little spacing / padding tweaks, the correct order of buttons, and making sure that all native widgets are fully represented in their XUL counterparts.

*Note: For KDE users, if an icon theme is ported to use the standard icon naming spec that Tango recommends, then it’ll inherit the same icon theme that the rest of the desktop would use too. For native looking widgets, there is GTK-QT. Of course there is Firefox ported to Qt as well.

If Firefox had native icon support and the tweaks mentioned above for the default theme, then it should just inherit the look of the desktop by default.

Happy Hulaween!

Monday, October 31st, 2005
“Happy Hulaween, everybody!”

a pumpkin with a carved in Hula logo